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When Is Your Privacy Really Private?

When Is Your Privacy Really Private?

Differential Privacy can potentially maintain an individual’s privacy while at the same time, allowing other “untrusted” entities to glean useful information from a large sample of data.

When carefully engineered, a Differential Privacy system is capable of permanently encrypting a set of private data, such as protected medical records, in such a way that they may not be unencrypted—in certain cases, even by the collector or aggregator itself. This post gives you the basics and helps explain why Apple could be an essential partner in the efforts to keep all our private data truly private.

Securing PHI: Thinking Outside the Box

Securing PHI: Thinking Outside the Box

SHAREIn healthcare, we don’t make it easy for ourselves to keep patient health information (PHI) safe. First, we plaster the patient’s name and DOB on top of every piece of paper in the chart! Second, we’re constantly faxing documents around because unencrypted email is considered unsafe (and yet everyone I know receives their faxes by unencrypted email). Once faxed, we have no idea who’s reading the material or who else they will send copies to. What’s always intrigued me is…

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Two Factor Auth – Why Banks have Embraced it and So Should You

Two Factor Auth – Why Banks have Embraced it and So Should You

SHAREIt was the late 1990’s and I was having dinner in Amsterdam with a senior security manager at HSBC bank. I asked him one simple question, “How safe is online banking?” To which he responded simply, “There isn’t a password in the world that can’t be cracked. If you’re not using a security token (aka “two factor authentication”), your money isn’t safe.” Roll forward almost two decades and two-factor authentication is almost pervasive, and not just in banking. Log into…

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Beyond Passwords: How Encryption Protects Your Patient Data

Beyond Passwords: How Encryption Protects Your Patient Data

SHAREPersonally and professionally, we are asked to enter passwords daily. Exactly how most of us select them is generally erratic at best and at worst, a discombobulated exercise in combining kindergarten metaphors, pet names, birthdates and some dubiously ergonomic pattern of letters and numbers from the keyboard. Even using sophisticated password software, the sheer number of passwords we are asked to juggle is unthinkable in a world where we no longer even commit commonly dialed phone numbers to memory. The…

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